We have the usual mob of American Robins this spring, thankfully. There seem to be enough grubs and worms to go around.

This robin uncharacteristically perched itself halfway up the trunk of an old maple to look in on me. Yes, that’s what it was doing, I have no doubt. One only has to watch birds and animals for a time to realize they are just as curious as we are. A survival trait, no doubt.

I opened the window to take this photograph, but the robin stayed put, directly opposite me, maybe a hundred feet away. Quite used to these humans, robins are. It was April 8 at 9:20 am.

In my last post, I noted the scarcity of squirrels and chipmunks so far this spring, suggesting it may be due to the presence of the Bald Eagles. Bird life seems little affected, however. The Gold Finches, sparrows, chickadees and juncos are all at the thistle feeder, in their usual number. Myriad other birds are flying about. Four species of ducks ply the pond. When an eagle appears, though, the gulls take to the air as one, and the Canada Geese honk a chorus of complaint.

The Great Blue Herons have arrived in force. Only one Double-crested Cormorant has shown up so far, but it’s early days for them.

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One Response to Curious Robin*

  1. Robin Mirollo says:

    What an unusual shot, Ron. We’re so used to seeing robins on the ground focusing all their attention on the hunt for worms rather than perched on a trunk checking out us humans. Your robin certainly isn’t camera shy like this Robin.

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