One of my dinner guests pulled me aside, drawing my attention to the moody, cloud-shrouded moon outside the window, just opposite across the pond.

The light was too low for “auto,” so I set the camera manually, then opened the window for a long handheld exposure, hoping for the best.

I was rushed — waiting guests were on mind — but happily the camera held steady. The stars are pinpoint sharp (which you can see if you enlarge the photo by clicking on it). However, the streetlights on the ground “bloomed,” as they were too bright for the long exposure.

The photo was taken on September 1, 2012, at 8:56 pm.

See related posts: Spirit Moon, Late Moon. Click image to enlarge it, and browser’s back arrow to close. Photo is best viewed in dim light. Comments are welcome.

 


I haven’t seen the Great Blue Herons on the pond for a while. Not since the big, concrete boat ramp was finished earlier this summer. Nowadays, one or more fishing boats can be almost always be seen on the water, at any time from early morning to late evening.

The Green Herons apparently have made their peace with the anglers. These small herons still appear outside my window every few days, but fly away when a boat approaches. The great blues haven’t shown up at all, except this one individual, and then only when it rains and there are no boats about.

What’s keeping the great blues away? Is it the boats, as I suggest, or are there other factors at play? Something killed thousands of little sunfish this spring. Perhaps that “something” has made the pond less hospitable for the great blues as well. Anglers who come in close to shore tell me there are still plenty of Largemouth Bass in the pond, which the great blues take. Time will tell.

This photo was taken on August 28, 2012, at 9:28 am, a few minutes before the rain stopped.

See related posts: Great Blue at Dawn*, Great Blue Icon*. Click image to enlarge it, and browser’s back arrow to close. Comments are welcome.

 


Here’s a molded polyethylene boat designed for sport fishing. Pedal-driven and loaded with features, it sells for almost $3,000. The following feature list is from the manufacturers web site:

    Features

    MirageDrive with Turbo Fins
    Vantage Seating
    Boa® System Lumbar Support
    Under Seat Tackle Storage
    Large Rectangular Hatch with Pivoting Tackle Management System
    Lowrance® Ready; Optional Adapter Available for Other Fishfinder Models
    Retractable Rudder System
    Horizontal Storage for Four Rods
    Replaceable Mounting Boards
    Large Front Hatch with Removable Liner
    Anchor Trolley System Ready
    Front & Rear Carrying Handles
    Livewell Ready Cargo Area

All that’s missing is a fax machine and wi-fi.

My father taught me that fishing is a way for us to get close to nature, and learn respect for nature. His philosophy: use simple equipment, and catch only what you intend to take home and eat.

Sport fishing? Some sport! Some fishing!

The photo was taken August 25, 2012, at 5:26 pm, under the suspicious glare of the boat’s captain.

See related post: Early Birds, Green Heaven. Click image to enlarge it, and browser’s back arrow to close. Comments are welcome.

 

[portfolio_slideshow class=alignleft speed=2000 width=665 click=fullscreen]

These are familiar subjects, but photographed from a fresh point of view. The durable, massed coneflowers, the two Green Herons that now appear daily at first light, the two young Mallard ducks on their daily paddle to breakfast, the rental community across the pond as reflected in the water — all were captured during three days near the end of August 2012. The date and time of each photo is posted beneath it.

Why am I suddenly seeing the small Green Herons after all these years? I have a theory. The gulls are gone, as I noted in an earlier post, including the aggressive, intimidating Great Black-backed Gulls, known to prey on smaller birds. Whether they were a threat to the Green Herons, I don’t know, but it’s possible. If you have a thought on this, please let me know.

See related posts: Two Green Herons, Green Heron Hopping.

Click thumbnails or use keyboard arrows to view slides on this page.

Click any image to open full-screen slide show. Use keyboard arrows to navigate; or press “Enter” key to start autoplay, and keyboard arrow to stop autoplay. Press “Esc” key to return.

 

I like to think of this blog as part chronicle and part photo gallery. Some photographs will be just reportorial. Others will seek to pierce the veil into a world of heightened perception, a world of drama or beauty, or both.

This photo falls into the former category. It is always reassuring to see one of these secretive birds, and to know that despite all the problems besetting our environment, the beautiful Black-crowned Night-Heron is still with us.

This is a juvenile bird, perched atop eponymously named Heron Rock, and captured in poor light on August 16, 2012, at 7:20 pm.

See related posts: Young Night-Heron*, Young Night Heron II. Click image to enlarge it, and browser’s back arrow to close. Comments are always welcome.

 

[portfolio_slideshow class=alignleft speed=2000 width=350 click=fullscreen]

This svelte, black cat is a frequent visitor to our yard. I’ve seen her prowling about at all times of the day and night. Yet her sleek coat and obvious good health make clear that she has a home and is well-cared-for.

In the slide show, she’s investigating our untidy raised flower bed, probably sniffing out a bird, or some other small creature, but obviously without success, because just a few seconds later she quit the scratchy thicket.

I told a feline-loving friend of once seeing this cat kill a dove. The friend took it philosophically. “Cats will be cats,” she said.

See related post: The Huntress*.

Click thumbnails or use keyboard arrows to view slides on this page.

Click any image to open full-screen slide show. Use keyboard arrows to toggle between slides. Press “Esc” key to return.